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INTERNATIONAL LAW
AND
REPARATIONS
The Inter-American System

Claudio Grossman,
Agustina del Campo,
Mina A.Trudeau

ISBN: 978-0-9978965-7-2
$59.95  9
13 pp 2018












EBOOK:
ISBN: 978-0-9978965-8-9
$30.00
SYNOPSIS

This book presents the most thorough analysis to date on the jurisprudence of the Inter-
American Human Rights Court (IACtHR) concerning full reparations. This jurisprudence
interprets Article 63 of the American Convention on Human Rights. In its interpretation of the
Convention, the IACtHR is guided by the important notion that human rights instruments
should be interpreted in light of its object and purpose, in accordance of the State members
of the Organization of the American States.

The Court’s jurisprudence ensures that victims of human rights violations are awarded not
only monetary compensation in cases, but also a full array of reparations designed to restore
their dignity and reaffirm the value of the rule of law. Accordingly, reparation also includes
moral compensation, guarantees of non-repetition, and truth as a measure of satisfaction. The
impact of the Inter-American jurisprudence in this matter has gone beyond the regional
hemispheric systems. The UN Committee Against Torture relied on the Court’s jurisprudence
in the drafting of General Comment No. 3, while the other regional human rights systems have
resorted to the Inter-American jurisprudence in developing their own concepts of reparation.

More specifically, the book explores the notions of “fair remedy,” “injured party,” and the
possibility of achieving “restitutio in integrum” for human rights violations through an analysis
of decisions issued by the Inter-American Court. The book urges its reader to consider not
only the current status of the law, but also the role played by victims, lawyers, Commissioners,
and Judges in its jurisprudential development. As a living instrument, the value of the
American Convention depends in great part on their actions and decisions. This book, by
presenting the role of the different actors through concrete cases that shaped the system,
encourages everyone to think how the System should continue to satisfy the aspirations of
justice in cases of human rights violations.

In order to emphasize the crucial understanding that the jurisprudence cannot remain static
and that new circumstances and different sets of facts could lead the Inter-American Court’s
jurisprudence to develop in directions that have not yet been addressed or even imagined,
this book not only presents the status of the law and the original documents essential for
legal reasoning, but also raises questions and presents problems in  a way that could prove
useful not only for practical purposes, but also for theoretical purposes by striving to achieve
coherence in the application of international legal standards.
CLAUDIO GROSSMAN, Professor and Dean Emeritus at
Washington College of Law, acted as a Commissioner of the
OAS' Inter-American Commission on Human Rights from
1993-2001, and its President in 1996 and 2001. During this
time, Grossman was appointed as the IACHR's first Special
Rapporteur on the Rights of Women, and its Special
Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Populations. He
served as Chair of the UN Committee on Torture (2008-2015)
and has just been elected to a five-year term on the UN's
International Law Commission.

AGUSTINA DEL CAMPO is an LLM graduate and former
Impact Litigation Project Coordinator at American University
Washington College of Law. She currently directs the
Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to
Information (CELE) in Argentina.

MINA A. TRUDEAU  is an alumna of the U.S. Fulbright
Program (Turkey) and American University Washington
College of Law, where she was a Public Interest/Public
Service Scholar.
A FOUNDATIONAL WORK ON INTERNATIONAL LAW AND
REPARATIONS
TABLE OF CONTENTS

All of the chapters follow a common methodology. After an introduction presenting the
topic, the chapters include a normative framework of valid sources of international law.
This is followed by the jurisprudence of the court, specifically leading cases, and later
an analysis section with questions raised by the Court’s jurisprudence. In every chapter
that follows, a detailed table of contents is provided.  Below is an instance of one such
table of contents:

CHAPTER ONE |
DEFINING VICTIM, BENEFICIARY, AND THE RIGHT OF ACTION

I. INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 4

II. NORMATIVE FRAMEWORK ....................................................................................................... 4
A. AMERICAN CONVENTION ON HUMAN RIGHTS ...................................................................4
    ARTICLE 1 ...................................................................................................................4
    ARTICLE 63 .................................................................................................................5
    B. RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE INTER-AMERICAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTS ...........5
    ARTICLE 2. DEFINITIONS ...........................................................................................5
    ARTICLE 50. CONVOCATION OF ALLEGED VICTIMS, WITNESSES, AND EXPERT
    WITNESSES .................................................................................................................6
    C. RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE INTER-AMERICAN COMMISSION ON
HUMAN RIGHTS ....................................................................................................................6
    ARTICLE 23. PRESENTATION OF PETITIONS ............................................................6
    D. BASIC PRINCIPLES AND GUIDELINES ON THE RIGHT TO A REMEDY AND REPARATION
FOR VICTIMS OF GROSS VIOLATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW AND
SERIOUS VIOLATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW ....................................7

III. DEFINING VICTIMS AND OTHER INJURED PARTIES ...............................................................8
    Blake v. Guatemala ...................................................................................................8
    Bamaca Velasquez v. Guatemala ...........................................................................10
    Juvenile Reeducation Institute v. Paraguay ........................................................12
    Moiwana Community v. Suriname .........................................................................15
    The Ituango Massacres v. Colombia .....................................................................17
    Miguel Castro Castro Prison v. Peru ....................................................................23
    The Saramaka People v. Suriname .......................................................................25
    Ticona Estrada et al. v. Bolivia ..............................................................................27
    Valle Jaramillo et al. v. Colombia ..........................................................................29
    Radilla-Pacheco v. Mexico ....................................................................................35
    ANALYSIS AND QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE COURT’S JURISPRUDENCE .................. 40

IV. IDENTIFICATION OF BENEFICIARIES ENTITLED TO REPARATIONS ................................... 42
    Velasquez Rodriguez v. Honduras ........................................................................42
    Aloeboetoe et al. v. Suriname ...............................................................................44
    Loayza Tamayo v. Peru ............................................................................................48
    Cantoral Benavides v. Peru ...................................................................................52
    Bamaca Velasquez v. Guatemala ...........................................................................57
    Myrna Mack Chang v. Guatemala ..........................................................................58
    Mapiripán Massacre v. Colombia ..........................................................................60
    Chaparro Álvarez and Lapo Íñiguez v. Ecuador ..................................................62
    Uson Ramirez v. Venezuela ...................................................................................66
    The Massacres of El Mozote and Nearby Places v. El Salvador .......................69
    Atala Riffo and Daughters v.Chile………………...........................………........……75
    Santo Domingo Massacre v. Colombia…......……………………………….........….79
    ANALYSIS AND QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE COURT’S JURISPRUDENCE .................. 82

V. SUCCESSORS AND HEIRS .......................................................................................................86
    Aloeboetoe et al. v. Suriname ...............................................................................86
    Bulacio v. Argentina ................................................................................................91
    Mapiripán Massacre v. Colombia ..........................................................................93
    Supreme Court of Justice (Quintana Coello et al.) v. Ecuador…………….…... 94
    ANALYSIS AND QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE COURT’S JURISPRUDENCE ......... 97

VI. SOCIETY AS VICTIM ................................................................................................................97
    Compulsory Membership in an Association Prescribed by Law for the
    Practice of Journalism (Arts. 13 and 29 American Convention on Human
    Rights) 98
    The Last Temptation of Christ (Olmedo Bustos et al) v. Chile ...........................99
    YATAMA v. Nicaragua ............................................................................................100
    Canese v. Paraguay ..............................................................................................104
    Claude Reyes v. Chile ....................................................................................,,,.. 106
    Palamara Iribarne v. Chile ............................................................................,,,,....109
    Afro-Descendant Communities Displaced from the Cacarica River Basin
    (Operation Genesis) v. Colombia………......………………………………,,,,,,,,,,..110
    ANALYSIS AND QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE COURT’S JURISPRUDENCE .........,,,,,... 122

VII. THE VICTIMS’ LEGAL ASSISTANCE FUND ............................................,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,........124
    The Kichwa Indigenous People of Sarayaku v. Ecuador ..................................124
    The Massacres of El Mozote and Surrounding Areas v. El Salvador .............130
    Furlan and Family v. Argentina ............................................................................137
    ANALYSIS AND QUESTIONS RAISED BY THE COURT’S JURISPRUDENCE ................ 143

CHAPTER TWO | COMPENSATION FOR DAMAGES

CHAPTER THREE | BEYOND COMPENSATION: RESTITUTIO IN INTEGRUM

CHAPTER FOUR |  ENSURING EFFECTIVENSS: ORDERING PROVISIONAL MEASURES AND
                        MONITORING COMPLIANCE